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Vaccine Hesitancy Workshop to be Held in Geneva November 18-19

LNCT and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s Vaccine Confidence Project will be holding a workshop in Geneva, Switzerland on November 18-19 to support countries in addressing vaccine hesitancy. The two-day workshop will bring together participants from six countries – Armenia, Georgia, Ghana, Lao PDR, Vietnam, and Uzbekistan – that have indicated vaccine hesitancy as a priority topic to co-create tools and strategies to assess and address vaccine hesitancy. Participants will explore LSHTM’s initial findings on vaccine hesitancy related challenges and the strategies countries are using to address them, learn from one another’s challenges and successes in addressing hesitancy, understand the array of tools that are available to assess and address hesitancy, adapt those tools to their country context and develop action plans to implement those tools. Co-developed tools and materials will be available for all LNCT members following the workshop.

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